STRESS REACTIVITY IN MITOCHONDRIAL DISEASE: PRELIMINARY INVESTIGATION OF PHYSIOLOGICAL, NEURAL, AND EPIGENETIC MECHANISMS

(UL1TR001873, CaMPR Phase II Award; Picard, M.)

A substantial proportion of the American population is burdened by disease conditions involving mitochondrial dysfunctions. Both inherited and acquired mitochondrial defects drive abnormal cellular gene expression and multisystemic dysregulation within the organism. We aim to identify the intracellular mechanisms by which mitochondria communicate with the cell nucleus to alter gene expression. This is an essential first step towards uncovering new potential therapeutic approaches to treat and/or prevent medical conditions, including primary mitochondrial diseases, critical care illnesses, and chronic stress pathophysiology for which there currently are no therapies.

This Collaborative and Multidisciplinary Pilot Research (CaMPR) Phase II award supports the establishment of the clinical and laboratory infrastructure for the Mitochondrial Stress, Brain Imaging, and Epigenetics (MiSBIE) study.

Marna Freed